Connie Noyes

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Connie Noyes is an award-winning painter whose work has been exhibited in Atlanta, Chicago, Washington, DC, Los Angeles and San Francisco, and abroad in London, Florence, Paris and Malaysia. In the 4th Annual Florence Biennale in 2003, she took a 5th place prize in painting from a field of 500 painters. She has been selected for prestigious residencies, including the Emaar International Art Symposium in Dubai, United Arab Emirates (2005); the Thupelo International Workshop in Cape Town, South Africa (2005); and the 6th Annual International Symposium of Art in Bulgaria (2006). Noyes’ work is in a number of public and private collections including that of the Art Institute of Chicago, where she earned her MFA.

 

Working in multiple formats and media, Connie Noyes is an original with a unique vision grounded in her distinctive imagination. Whether she is painting, photographing, or constructing, Noyes’ creations are inspired by the irregular shapes and involved lines that dance through her mind’s eye and that she integrates into alluring patterns through disciplined composition.

Noyes is at her best when she goes full tilt, layering her surfaces and compounding forms into dense abstractions that draw the viewer into the complex interconnections that she stages. Although Noyes’ productions are suggestive of emotion and meaning, they work primarily on a perceptual, rather than a psychological or conceptual level, by beckoning the viewer into the systems of incomplete order that emerge from the moment of “chaos” in her creative process.

Among the rising generation of artists, Noyes is among the few who are not derivative and who take a welcome fresh and individual approach.

 

Michael Weinstein, 2010


statement

 

HUMAN STEPS is a dialog, which references the many disparate elements encountered in daily urban life – a metaphor for the way in which dark affects light and vice versa, how the sweet can become sickly if overdone and how close proximity to millions of people, diverse cultures and visual images can both inspire and overwhelm. It is a metaphor for tight quarters, pleasant or not so pleasant meetings and vibrant energy of the city in contrast to shadowy and emotionally difficult places.

For HUMAN STEPS, I use what most people consider garbage as a jumping off place in the work. The materials at one point might have been utilitarian, but were never considered beautiful. The hard, shiny, plastic surfaces often synonymous to commercial objects, would never pass inspection as such. Dirt falls onto the canvases, scratches, cracks, marks occur and there are no straight lines, only the illusion of such. Through the act of turning detritus into “works of art”, or elevating the prestige of garbage, I aim to question the status quo of beauty, worthiness and usability.

 

-Connie Noyes